HUD environmental review ensures your project complies with necessary laws and regulations,
such as:
  • Floodplain Management
  • Wetland Protection
  • Coastal Zone Management Act
  • Sole Source Aquifers
  • Endangered Species Act
  • Wild and Scenic Rivers
  • Air Quality
  • Farmland and Protection Policy Act
  • Environmental Justice
  • Noise Abatement and Control
  • Toxic/Hazardous/Radioactive Materials, Contamination,
  • Chemicals or Gases
  • Siting of HUD-assisted Projects near Hazardous Operations
  • Airport Clear Zones and Accident Potential Zones

US Housing Urban Development Environmental Review Records Services

All HUD-assisted projects are required to undergo an environmental review to evaluate environmental impacts. The analysis includes both how the project can affect the environment and how the environment can affect the project, site, and end users.


An environmental review must be performed before any funds, regardless of source, are committed to a project. Documentation of the environmental review should be maintained in the environmental review record. This record contains the description of all activities that are part of the project and an evaluation of the effects of the project on the human environment and vice versa. This record should be made available for public review.


GEPermit has the expertise to successfully and efficiently navigate every step of the HUD compliance process for clients. Over the last ten years, GEPermit staff have prepared over 2,500 HUD 4128s across 10 states, including CA, AZ, NM, TX, PA, CO, FL, and CT. This in-depth experience, combined with the commitment to high-quality work, positions GEPermit as one of the top consulting and planning firms in HUD compliance.


In one such collaboration, GEPermit served as one of the primary environmental consultants for HUD’s American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) grant projects. We were very proud to be a part of this effort, which supported small to very large-scale development activities in excess of $153,000,000 throughout the United States.
These types of projects included critical tasks such as acquisition, rehabilitation, and redevelopment of a variety of properties, including vacant lots, single family, multi family developments and commercial properties.

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